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High Quality Care

The right psychologist and treatment approach can help you get back to it. Some of the following may be recommended by your psychologist, depending on your issues and needs:

Evidence-based Treatments

Often our emotions feel out of control, but we can manage them more effectively with greater awareness and mastery of evidence-based techniques that are proven to be effective in treating mental health issues. Mental health disorders are common, with about 20% of Australians experiencing a mental disorder every year.

The right psychologist and treatment approach can help you get back to it. Some of the following may be recommended by your psychologist, depending on your issues and needs:

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): CBT is a popular form of treatment for a majority of mental health disorders / issues that aims to modify dysfunctional emotions, behaviours, and thoughts by encouraging you to challenge unhelpful thoughts and change destructive patterns of behaviour.

Schema therapy: Schema therapy is a cognitive therapy, whereby self-defeating patterns (schemas) are developed in early childhood. These consist of negative/dysfunctional thoughts and feelings, that are repeated and serve as obstacles for accomplishing one’s goals and getting one’s needs met. Schemas are perpetuated behaviourally. The goal of treatment is to help break these negative patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving, and to develop healthier alternatives to replace them.

Evidence-based Treatments

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): ACT involves accepting what is not within your personal control, and committing to action that improves and riches your quality of life, which is guided by ones deepest values. This is taught through 6 core principles including connecting with the present, defusion / detachment, acceptance, observing, recognising values, and committing to action based on values even if it is uncomfortable.

Solution Focused Therapy: A brief therapy that uses tools to elicit conversations directed towards achieving the clients’ solutions to the presenting problems. It is goal-directed and forward moving, rather than focusing on the problem brought to the therapeutic room.

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT): IPT is a treatment approach that focuses on the relationships you have with others as a strong predictor of how you feel (eg loss, or conflict). Strategies for how to manage relationships are discussed, with the premise that changing circumstances can improve mood. It is often used to treat depression.

Motivational Interviewing: Motivational interviewing is a directive, client-centred counselling approach used for eliciting behaviour change. It aims to help clients to explore and resolve ambivalence. It is more focused and goal-directed. It is often used to resolve behaviour change.

Narrative Therapy: In narrative therapy, events occurring in our lives are viewed as stories, which ultimately shape ones identity through helping clients recognise that they are separate to their problems, and ultimately can re-write their stories for a future who reflects who they are and what their purpose is; separate to their problems.